Electronics

I am constantly in the pursuit of making electrons do things they wouldn’t normally do.

1. 1GHz Active Differential Probe

Week 2 Revision of the PCB.

Week 2 Revision of the PCB.

An ultra high input impedance (0.5pF||30MΩ or better) high bandwidth differential oscilloscope probe designed, built, and revised over the course of two weekends for the 2014 MakeMIT hardware hackathon. It can be built for about $30 in parts, plus the cost of etching or sending out a PCB and (optionally) 3D printing a chassis. The project was in the top 10 the first week, advancing the team to the second week, where it took second place.

2. Induction Heater 1.0

Testing at home the morning of the demo.

Testing at home the morning of the demo.

An induction heater built for my 11th grade AP Physics E&M midyear project. Contactless heating occurs through induced eddy current IIR losses and hysteresis losses. Hundreds of amperes of current are forced to run through the workpiece by a full bridge of CM200 IGBTs driving a resonant LC circuit through a matching transformer.

3. Induction Heater 2.0 (and Continuing Induction Heater Work)

Running with a water loop at 1kW input power.

Running with a water loop at 1kW input power.

After my first hastily assembled induction heater served its purpose as physics midyear project, I decided to start over with better materials, better construction, and better design. Induction heater 2.0 is the product of this ongoing effort, and has been tested up to a kilowatt of input power or so (pictured above). Currently, I’m focusing on improving the gate drive and microcontroller-based driver (pictured below). Ultimately, I hope to switch from a manually-tuned fixed frequency oscillator with detuning for power control to a feedback-based oscillator with pulse width modulation or adjustable phase shift across an H-bridge for power control.

Driving some gates.

Driving some gates.

 

4. 5DOF Robotic Arm (for the Science Olympiad)

An automated robotic arm built for the “Robotic Arm” high school science olympiad event.

Read the Instructable

5. Digital Salinometer (also for the Science Olympiad)

A salinity measurement device built for the “Water Quality” high school science olympiad event.

Testing an oscillator on the main board.

Testing an oscillator on the main board.

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